How Much Weight Can A Horse Carry Calculator

How Much Weight Can A Horse Carry Calculator

Introduction

If you’re wondering how much weight a horse can carry, it’s probably because you are getting ready to go on a long trek across the wilderness. Maybe you have never ridden a horse before and don’t know what to expect from your animal. Maybe it has been some time since the last time you went riding and need refreshing on just how much those big beasts can handle. Whatever your reason for wanting this information, we’ve got an easy-to-use calculator that will help you determine how much weight a horse can carry. So, whether you’re packing up your own gear or planning to bring along another person, be sure that you don’t overload your horse!

How Much Weight Can A Horse Carry Calculator

The key to a safe, comfortable ride is to watch for the horse muscle’s soreness. You should keep in mind that these animals start feeling significant strain and pain when carrying a person weighing more than 20% of its weight.

  • Enter your horse’s weight.
  • Enter the weight of your gear and saddle.
  • Calculate how much weight you can carry!

What is the carrying capacity of your horse?

The carrying capacity of your horse can be calculated by adding up the weight of the rider and saddle, and then adding the weight of all other gear such as tack, grooming and food.

The average weight of a rider plus their gear is around 100 pounds (45 kilograms). The average weight of a saddle plus its accessories is between 20 to 40 pounds (9 to 18 kilograms), depending on how much equipment it has on it.

Calculator: How much weight can my horse carry? - Good Horse

Calculate the weight load of your horse in seconds.

Calculate the weight load of your horse in seconds.

  • Enter the height and width of your horse (in inches).
  • Enter how much it weighs, including all tack and equipment (in pounds).
  • The result will be a calculation of how much weight your horse can carry safely.

Live Load on a Horse

The average round of ammunition (ARA) is a standard weight used to calculate the amount of weight a horse can carry.

ARA = Average Round of Ammunition

10% x ARA = 10% of ARA

10% x 10% x ARA = 0.1 * 0.1 * ARA

Dead Load on a Horse

In addition to the live load, you need to calculate the dead load. The dead load is the weight of your rider and gear, including tack, a blanket and saddle. As such, it should be calculated at 10% of your horse’s live load. To find out how much your horse can carry in total (live+dead), multiply this value by 3 or 4 (depending on whether you’re using an English or Western saddle).

For example: A 1000 lb horse can carry 300 lbs of live weight plus up to 270 lbs of dead weight (the rider’s weight + gear). If that rider weighs 150 lbs plus 50 lbs worth of tack and other items, then he or she will be adding about 110 pounds’ worth of dead load. Plugging all these variables into our handy tool above will give us an answer for this individual example; namely: Your 1000 lb animal may safely carry 1110 pounds’ worth total combined live plus dead loads!

Proper Horses’ Sizes For Particular Riders

What is essential for safe riding is that the horse’s size is proportionate to your size. For example, if you are too tall for the horse, this disproportion will make you struggle to stay balanced during the whole horse ride.

On the other hand, you will have trouble using your legs effectively when you are too short for the horse. For example, inappropriately wrapping the legs around the horse’s body can make a problem for the horse.

The horse’s width and barrel size will be appropriate for you to ride safely only when wrapping your legs around its sides properly. That way, you can effortlessly command the horse by using the stirrups.

Live Load = Rider with Gear + Saddle + Pad

Live Load = Rider with Gear + Saddle + Pad

The Live Load is the total weight of you, your saddle and saddle pad. If you are riding bareback, add in the weight of your clothes as well.

Dead Load = Saddle + Pad + Rider with Gear x ARA when you factor in 10% drop due to dirt and sand.

When you factor in the 10% drop due to dirt and sand, you get the ARA (Adjusted Rider Weight). To calculate your horse’s ARA, add up the following:

  • Saddle + Pad + Rider with Gear (Dirt and Sand Factor)
  • Example: 1,000 lb pad x 1,000 lb saddle + 200 lb rider = 2,100 lbs. 2,100 lbs x 0.9 = 1,845 lbs. This is your adjusted rider weight or ARA (1,845 lbs).

This calculator will tell you how much weight you can safely put on your horse.

This calculator will tell you how much weight you can safely put on your horse.

You’ll need to know the weight of the person, their tack (saddle, bridle, saddlebags etc.), and any food or water they’re carrying to use this calculator.

Conclusion

There was a time when it would have taken you hours to calculate the weight load of your horse, but now it can be done in seconds with our easy-to-use tool. We hope you’ll find this calculator useful and do check back as we add more fun features!

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