How To Travel Long Distance With A Cat

How To Travel Long Distance With A Cat

Introduction

It seems like more people are choosing to travel with their pets these days. Even though it can be stressful for both of you to travel with your cat, with some planning and preparation, it can be done safely and calmly. So let’s get started on how to make a long distance trip with your feline friend:

Bring their favorite toys.

Bring their favorite toys.

Your cat will be confined to a carrier for much of the trip, so it’s important that you bring along familiar and comforting items. Most cats enjoy playing with small balls or other small toys that can be easily hidden in paws or mouths, but there are plenty of other options as well: try little catnip mice, feather toys (or even feathers alone), or paper bags rolled up into fun shapes. You should also consider bringing grooming brushes or combs; this can help keep your cat feeling clean and relaxed while they’re stuck in the carrier.

It’s important to note that most airlines have strict regulations regarding what kinds of items are allowed to be carried on board—check with yours before packing! Also make sure any items brought onto the plane are small enough not only to fit through security but also through your pet’s carrier door. Otherwise, you might end up losing them on your trip.

Take them to the vet beforehand.

Take your cat to the vet beforehand. Make sure they are up-to-date on vaccines, flea and tick medication, parasite prevention, heartworm prevention and more. If you don’t know if they’ve ever been vaccinated or what their recent health history is like, it’s worth getting a checkup done just to find out how healthy they are.

You don’t want a situation where your cat gets sick halfway through your trip (or worse: dies) because you didn’t have time for this step or didn’t think it was necessary.

Consider a homeopathic product that might help alleviate some stress.

Consider a homeopathic product that might help alleviate some stress.

It’s important to consider whether your cat is exhibiting any signs of stress. If you’re worried about this, speak to your vet or an animal behaviourist for advice on how best to proceed.

Homeopathy can be effective in treating many behavioural problems in animals and may help reduce the amount of stress your cat feels when travelling long distances with you. Homeopathic products are safe and effective, but remember that they won’t replace other treatments prescribed by your vet if there are any underlying health issues causing the behavioural symptoms you’re seeing

Make sure they have ID tags and are microchipped

A microchip is a small, permanent identification device that can be implanted in your cat’s skin to help you find them if they go missing. It’s not required for travel (but it is recommended), but consider getting one if:

  • You are traveling with multiple cats and want to keep them all together. If one of the cats runs away, having the other cat’s information on file will help locate them once they’re lost.
  • You’re traveling with very young kittens or seniors who might be harder to track down in a timely fashion.

Use a carrier instead of letting your cat roam free in the car.

You may think that you’re giving your cat a treat by letting him sit on the dashboard or in your lap, but that type of behavior can be dangerous for everyone involved. If he jumps out of the car when you open the door, he could be seriously injured or even killed by traffic.

Using a carrier instead of letting your cat roam free in the car also prevents him from getting distracted by all of those unfamiliar sights and sounds outside, which could lead to an accident. Carriers usually have mesh windows so cats can still see out; if you don’t have one but want one with windows (for easier breathing), check out our list of Best Cat Carriers With Windows!

If you can, keep to their normal schedule.

The more you can keep your cat’s daily routine the same while traveling, the better. It’s a good idea to try to keep them on a regular schedule as much as possible so they don’t get thrown off while trying to adjust to new surroundings and people. If you’re staying with family or friends and have access to their house, consider letting them set up their own litter box in their bathroom or laundry room if they are used to having one nearby. This way, when you’re gone for long periods of time (like overnight), your cats will still have their usual place for potty breaks or naps without having any extra stress in this unfamiliar setting.

Stay calm yourself and don’t make a big deal out of car rides.

The second most important thing you can do is remain calm yourself. When you’re nervous or anxious, your cat will sense it and become more anxious too. So, don’t make a big deal out of car rides. Do not yell at your cat while you are in motion or when parked at rest stops on the highway; cats do not like to be yelled at, especially during a long drive when they may already be feeling sick to their stomachs because of motion sickness. Also avoid making loud noises as much as possible—for example, don’t blast music if it makes your cat upset or jumpy! Be nice to each other and try not to get too frustrated with one another because nobody will enjoy the experience if they are constantly fighting with each other

If you’re flying, find a direct flight if possible, and make sure your cat’s carrier fits under the seat in front of you.

If you’re flying, find a direct flight if possible, and make sure your cat’s carrier fits under the seat in front of you. The last thing you need is to be stuck waiting for a new carrier because your pet is too big or heavy for the one you brought with them.

You should also check with the airline to see if they have any policies regarding pets on their flights. Some airlines don’t allow pets at all, while others will let them fly as long as they weigh less than 20 pounds and fit in an approved carrier that can be placed under the seat in front of you. Additionally, some airlines may require a fee to bring your cat along on their flight — so do some research before booking!

If possible, try not to book flights directly after flying somewhere else (like from New York City to Los Angeles). This gives Fluffy time to acclimate back into normal life before she’s whisked away again by air travel!

Give them plenty of water during the trip so they stay hydrated.

Giving your cat plenty of water is important. Not only will it help them keep their weight down and hydrated, but you might also find that they drink more if they have access to fresh water while in the carrier.

Don’t forget to bring some extra bottled water for yourself! It’s easy to get dehydrated when traveling, especially if there are long stretches between stops where you can’t get out and stretch your legs or grab a snack.

Give them just enough water so they don’t get sick from over-hydration or dehydration on the trip, but don’t give them too much—you should be able to tell when your cat has had enough by watching its behavior and how much its drinking (you should see their tongue extend slightly after each sip).

Even though it can be stressful for both of you to travel with your cat, with some planning and preparation, it can be done safely and calmly.

Even though it can be stressful for both of you to travel with your cat, with some planning and preparation, it can be done safely and calmly.

Cats are more stressed by travel than people are. The cat’s world is one in which everything is always changing: new places, new people, unfamiliar sounds and smells. This change can cause stress that interferes with the cat’s ability to get enough sleep at night or maintain normal eating patterns during the day. This can lead to an unhappy traveling companion who may also have trouble using his litter box properly while he’s on the road (or in an airport lounge!).

Conclusion

Overall, traveling with your cat can be stressful for both of you, but with some planning and preparation, it’s possible to do it calmly and safely. If you keep your cat in a carrier during car trips, give them plenty of water if you’re flying, or taking them on a train or bus, make sure they have ID tags and are microchipped in case they get lost, and bring their favorite toys along to make the trip as pleasant as possible for both of you! I hope that this article has been helpful in preparing you for traveling with your cat.

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