Is It Illegal To Bury A Horse On Your Own Property

Is It Illegal To Bury A Horse On Your Own Property

Introduction

Can you bury a horse on your own property? This is a question that comes up surprisingly often. People love their horses, and it’s natural to want to give them a good home, even in death. But the laws regarding burial of horses vary widely from place to place, so it’s important to educate yourself before planning any kind of private funeral for a beloved equine friend.

Can I legally bury a horse on my own property?

It depends on where you live. Each state has its own regulations, and if you are considering burying a horse on your property, it is best to check with your local government for specific regulations that may apply. Generally speaking, no, but there are some situations where this might be allowed.

If the horse was put down due to old age or illness and not euthanized by a veterinarian after being injured in an accident (for example), it can be buried on your own property as long as you do not intend on breeding from the animal again or selling meat from any part of its body to others. However, pet or livestock animals such as horses are considered a bio-hazard; therefore special considerations must be made when disposing them off your property—and usually this means asking for permission from your city or county before burying them anywhere near homes or businesses nearby!

This depends on where you live. The laws governing animal burial vary from state to state, and even county to county. You should check with your local government for specific regulations that may apply.

The answer to this question depends on where you live. The laws governing animal burial vary from state to state, and even county to county. You should check with your local government for specific regulations that may apply.

For example, the Animal Legal & Historical Center lists some of the various rules regarding cremating or burying animals in Arizona:

  • Maricopa County prohibits burying dead animals on public lands, but doesn’t mention private property at all; Pima County has no regulations about pet burial at all; and Santa Cruz County bans pets from being buried anywhere except in an approved pet cemetery or within an owner’s own property (and then only under certain conditions).

Is it the same as burying a pet or other animal?

If you want to bury a horse on your own property, the legality of that depends on where you live. Contact your local government department or animal control office and ask them if there are any specific regulations that apply to the burial of horses, pets and other animals in your area. Some places may require that you get a burial permit from them before burying an animal on your private property. Others may require that the body be processed by a veterinarian first, or even cremated instead of buried.

Generally, no. Pet or livestock animals such as horses are considered a bio-hazard, requiring special consideration and disposal.

Generally, no. Pet or livestock animals such as horses are considered a bio-hazard, requiring special consideration and disposal. However, check with your local government for specific regulations regarding burial of your horse. Some states may have laws that require the body to be picked up by a licensed professional who will dispose of it properly. In some states you can bury an animal on your own property (with limited exceptions) if they die while being transported across state lines but this is not common practice in most areas. You should also check with your veterinarian or local humane society to determine if there are any other restrictions on burial of pets in the area where you live.

In short — generally no but call around before burying him in case there’s something special about his breed or type of animal (horse) that makes him more likely than others to contaminate ground water etc…

Bury a Horse On Your Own Property

A horse bio-hazard is a bio-hazard that contains the remains of a horse. If a property owner has to dispose of a dead horse, they must make sure that it meets certain standards before burying it in their backyard.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates how equine carcasses are handled when they are considered bio-hazards and must be disposed of properly by trained professionals who have the proper equipment to handle them safely and legally. Horse owners can bury horses on their own property if . . .

Conclusion

There are some federal and state laws that make it illegal to bury animals on your own property. But these laws differ depending on what state you live in, so check with local authorities before you do anything else. You should also consult with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) if they have jurisdiction over your land or provide assistance by calling them at 1-800-227-8917.

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