Life Expectancy Of A Cat With Autoimmune Disease

Life Expectancy Of A Cat With Autoimmune Disease

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A cat’s life expectancy can be tricky to predict in any given case. But, on average, most cats have a life expectancy of 12-20 years. A cat with an autoimmune disease, however, will likely live a bit shorter than the average cat due to the stress and strain that these conditions have on their bodies. Fortunately, there are steps you can take as a caregiver to help optimize your cat’s lifespan and quality of life. A new study published in Nature has uncovered genetic markers for feline autoimmunity. This could enable breeders to screen for certain breeds at risk for developing autoimmunity and implement breeding practices that reduce the risk of producing cats with autoimmunity. It cannot stop autoimmunity from developing or reverse it once it develops but it could extend the lifespan of cats that carry these gene markers by preventing them from being bred and extending their lives as pets if they do not carry those markers.

What Is Autoimmunity?

Autoimmune diseases are conditions in which a person’s immune system has mistakenly attacked their own body. It is not fully known why this happens. Some people believe that a genetic link is present to make some individuals more susceptible to developing autoimmune diseases, but this has not yet been proven. Autoimmune diseases are not infectious or contagious, meaning the person cannot “give” the disease to another person. The person cannot “catch” the autoimmune disease from another person either. Autoimmune diseases can occur in all parts of the body, but are most commonly found in the joints, organ systems, and the blood vessels. There are many different types of autoimmune diseases, including but not limited to rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis. Although these diseases have different names, the causes and treatments are often very similar.

Chronic Renal Disease (CRD)

Chronic renal disease, or CRD, is a disease where the kidneys do not function correctly. It is a common disease in cats that can lead to serious health complications such as a buildup of toxins in the bloodstream (known as hyperkalemia), urination disorders, and an inability to regulate the body’s fluid levels, among other symptoms. There are many risk factors associated with CRD, including but not limited to age, diet, genetics, lifestyle, environment, and medical conditions. There is no known cure for CRD, and treatment is aimed at slowing or stopping the progression of the disease, improving quality of life, and extending a cat’s lifespan.

Feline Idiopathic Cystitis (FIC) Or Feline Urologic Syndrome (FUS)

Feline idiopathic cystitis, or FIC, and feline urologic syndrome, or FUS, are two different names for the same disease. It is a common urological disease in cats, and the cause is not fully understood. Some animals display signs of FIC while others develop FUS. Researchers have identified some risk factors associated with FIC and FUS, including but not limited to age, diet, genetics, lifestyle, environment, and medical conditions. There is no known cure for FIC or FUS, and treatment is aimed at relieving symptoms, improving quality of life, and extending a cat’s lifespan.

Feline autoimmune thyroid disease (FAIT)

Feline autoimmune thyroid disease, or FAIT, is a disease in which the immune system attacks a cat’s thyroid gland, causing the gland to become overactive or underactive. Regardless of which abnormality occurs, a cat’s metabolism will be severely affected. There are many risk factors associated with FAIT, including but not limited to age, diet, genetics, lifestyle, environment, and medical conditions. There is no known cure for FAIT, and treatment is aimed at managing the symptoms and extending a cat’s lifespan.

Bottom line

The important takeaway from this information is that autoimmunity is a complex disease in which the body’s own immune system turns against itself and starts attacking healthy cells and organs, like the thyroid or kidneys. This is different from an infectious disease like feline leukemia, which can be transmitted from one cat to another. In the case of an autoimmunity disorder, it is not contagious and has nothing to do with how a person was exposed to the disease. There is a genetic link that has not been fully explored or proven, but it is clear that some cats are more susceptible to developing autoimmunity than others.

What Is Being Done To Help Cats?

A new study published in Nature has uncovered genetic markers for feline autoimmunity. This could enable breeders to screen for certain breeds at risk for developing autoimmunity and implement breeding practices that reduce the risk of producing cats with autoimmunity. It cannot stop autoimmunity from developing or reverse it once it develops but it could extend the lifespan of cats that carry these gene markers by preventing them from being bred and extending their lives as pets if they do not carry those markers. These findings could also protect hybrid cats by preventing the breeding of susceptible hybrids. Although hybrid cats often come with a hefty price tag, the money that can be made from the sale of these cats is worth it considering the medical advances that may be made because of the research. In addition to the genetic markers, researchers also identified certain environmental factors that may affect the development of autoimmunity such as a low-quality diet, stress, and antibiotics or other medications. It is important to note that these factors do not cause the disease but can make it progress more quickly or may contribute to a cat developing the disease.

How Can Autoimmune Disease Be Prevented?

There is no surefire way to prevent a cat from developing an autoimmune disease. However, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of a cat developing this condition. These include but are not limited to: – Feeding a high-quality diet – Preventing the use of antibiotics and other medications when possible – Keeping the cat’s stress levels low and providing plenty of social interaction – Not adopting an elderly cat, especially one that is at risk for developing autoimmunity

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