Living In A Van With A Cat

Living In A Van With A Cat

Introduction

I’ve been living in a van for about 10 years now. Not only do I sleep in it but I also cook, shower, and even work on the road sometimes. When I’m not moving around, I live in my van in a parking lot near the beach where I can walk there every day at no cost.

Having a cat in a van is awesome for me. I’m single and live alone, so my cat really has no competition for my attention.

Let me start by saying that having a cat is awesome. I’m single and live alone, so my cat really has no competition for my attention. He’s also a great companion. We can spend weeks on the road together without getting bored of each other, which is pretty much unheard of in human relationships! The freedom to just go wherever you want—and then come back home to your own space—is fantastic. No rent, no mortgage payments, no neighbors (unless you invite them), zero utility bills and costs associated with lawn maintenance or home repairs…the list goes on. There are even some perks: not only does it save money on food costs (because cats are totally low maintenance), but when you’re traveling long distances by van there’s often nowhere else to stop but Walmart or another big box retailer where you can stock up on cheap groceries at any time of day or night!

I have a routine where I feed the cat and myself, then pack up the bedding while she’s eating.

I have a routine where I feed the cat and myself, then pack up the bedding while she’s eating. This way, I don’t have to worry about her sneaking into my bed when I’m asleep. She knows what time I go to bed, and if she’s going to be an issue then that’s fine—she can sleep in her carrier in the back of my van until morning so as not to disturb me.

The only problem with doing things this way is that it means being awake at night when everyone else is sleeping. You can always tell who lives in a van because they’re always getting up at odd hours of the night for various reasons: going outside for some fresh air; taking out trash; making coffee; etc. It can get pretty lonely sometimes too!

When I get up to drive somewhere it takes her a few minutes to get her bearings, but once they’re set she’s fine.

If you’re a cat owner, you know that your feline friend is a master of adaptation. They can adjust to new environments in a matter of minutes, days or even months depending on how much they are forced to change their routine.

I’ve been living out of my van for almost two years now and I have learned a lot about how my cat adjusts to our nomadic lifestyle. When we first started living in the van full time, she got used to it within an hour or so after getting out at night time and coming back during the day—that was easy for her since she had already gotten used to sleeping on top of me every night when we lived together in an apartment.

But what about all other times? How does she deal with not having any permanent place like before? Well, it turns out that #Vanlife doesn’t seem like that big of a leap from normal life for her because she has made herself at home wherever we go: whether its outside by the river bank where there’s plenty of shade; inside my parked vehicle where it’s cool enough even when parked outside during hot summer days (she just sleeps under blankets); etc., she just tries whatever works best!

If you leave the cat in the van while you go shopping or whatever, stash her in a carrier with food and water and keep the windows open a crack so she won’t suffocate.

  • If you leave the cat in the van while you go shopping or whatever, stash her in a carrier with food and water and keep the windows open a crack so she won’t suffocate.
  • Don’t leave your cat locked in your truck on hot days; if it’s going to be sunny out, get her out of there and into some shade. Remember: cats are finicky about temperature regulation. They need cooling just as much as we do!

Cats do well outdoors, especially when they’ve been exposed to it from kittenhood.

Cats are built to adapt, so you’ll want to expose them as much as possible to their new environment. Cats love climbing on top of things, so you’ll want to make sure there’s places for them to climb in the van. Cats also love jumping, so make sure there are good places for them to jump onto and off of. They will want/need a litter box in their shelter as well!

As your cats become accustomed to their new home and surroundings, they may still be wary at first when they encounter people or animals outside the vehicle. You can help alleviate this by taking your cat out frequently if possible (but always keep an eye out for dangers).

A lot of people with cats also have dogs so I assume there’s no reason you couldn’t have both if you had room for them.

I believe that a lot of people with cats also have dogs so I assume there’s no reason you couldn’t have both if you had room for them. The essential difference between the two is that cats are territorial and dogs are protective. If you already have a dog, this might be the best time to get your cat because they often get along well (I’ve heard stories of both loving each other). As long as your cat respects its boundaries and doesn’t enter into your dog’s territory or vice versa, then it’ll work out just fine!

Cats also make great companions on road trips because they’re independent enough to entertain themselves at home while you’re out adventuring. They can even help keep down rodents in your van if needed!

I think one of the things that makes your life easier is not being tied down to an apartment or house that you have to pay rent on all the time.

One of the things that makes your life easier is not being tied down to an apartment or house that you have to pay rent on all the time.

When you’re in a box, it costs money to move. When you’re living in a van, it costs nothing. You can go anywhere and do anything without having to worry about paying rent or utilities—or even food if necessary!

Renting an apartment also means paying for electricity and water bills every month, as well as cable TV if you want it (which I don’t recommend). If you live in a van, these expenses are non-existent. The only thing left is gasoline for your vehicle—and even that can be reduced by finding free campsites where available (as opposed to staying at hotels).

It is hard having just one room – everything is all piled up in there at once, unlike a house where you can spread out over several rooms.

  • You have to live with your stuff. You can’t get rid of anything, because if you do, that’s something else that will need to be carried around and stored somewhere else when you’re not in the van. This means that every single item becomes important, because there’s nowhere for it to go. All these things become a constant part of your life and an ever-present reminder of how much stuff you own (or don’t).
  • You have to be careful not to get too much stuff. If you fill up all available space with your belongings, then there won’t be room for other things like a bed or clothes or food (and cats). Additional items can only add so much value before they start making things harder than they need to be: greater weight makes driving more difficult; more physical space means less privacy; etc., etc., ad infinitum until total chaos reigns supreme across the land!

It feels like camping a lot of the time, which is fine with me but some people wouldn’t enjoy that.

If you’re the type of person who loves camping and roughing it, then living in your van will be fun and relaxing. If you’re not, then it can be stressful and dangerous.

If you plan on living out of your vehicle full time or even just part time, make sure that your vehicle has enough space for everything you need. Some people put their entire life into their van – including furniture! This is great if you have plenty of room inside but there’s also an option where everything is packed away neatly so that nothing takes up any space at all (except maybe a few small items like clothing). Even if the only thing in your van is yourself and a cat, having everything organized properly will help keep things more comfortable when parked somewhere overnight or longer than expected due to bad weather conditions preventing travel at certain hours during daylight hours (or darkness since some people prefer sleeping without artificial light).

Having lots of freedom can compensate for living in a van with only one room

When you live in a van, you have the freedom to travel and move around. You’re not tied down to one place or one job. You can be as nomadic as you want and explore wherever your heart desires. These are some of the reasons why people choose this lifestyle over living in an apartment or house, even if it means giving up some things like having a kitchen or bathroom.

You’ll also have plenty of space for your cat who won’t feel cramped at all since everything will be concentrated into one room rather than spread out over multiple rooms that would require traveling from here to there just to get what they need.”

Conclusion

I think having lots of freedom can compensate for living in a van with only one room. It is hard to have just one room – everything is all piled up in there at once, unlike a house where you can spread out over several rooms. But it feels like camping a lot of the time, which is fine with me but some people wouldn’t enjoy that. I don’t have any regrets about living in my van because it has given me so much freedom and mobility!

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