Living With A Cat With Allergies

Living With A Cat With Allergies

Introduction

If you’re allergic to cats, it can be frustrating. You love the cat like a family member, but your body reacts to their fur or dander anyway. We’ve outlined some tips that may help you manage these allergies.

It can be frustrating to have an allergic reaction to a cat and not be able to do anything about it.

It can be frustrating to have an allergic reaction to a cat and not be able to do anything about it.

Allergic reactions are often caused by exposure to pollen, dust mites, or animal dander. Cats produce saliva and oil from the sebaceous glands in their skin that can irritate the airways of those with allergies. For some people, even being around cats is enough to trigger symptoms such as nasal congestion, sneezing, eye irritation and difficulty breathing if they have asthma or other lung conditions like COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Cats should not be kept indoors exclusively due to the increased risk of infection from fleas and ticks if they’re allowed outside; however when they’re indoors you’ll need to keep windows closed so that allergens don’t find their way into your home through open windows. You might also consider getting an air purifier for your bedroom where most of the time would be spent sleeping if possible since we spend one third of our lives there!

You can’t really cure the allergy itself, but there are plenty of ways to reduce your suffering.

In addition to finding ways to limit your exposure to the allergen, there are a few other things you can do if you have allergies and still want to keep your cat.

  • Get allergy medication.
  • Find another home for the cat (if possible).
  • Keep your bedroom door closed at night so as not to wake up with a stuffy nose every morning from dust mites or pollen stuck in your pillowcase.

The first thing you need is to get tested and identify the source of your allergy.

The first thing you need is to get tested and identify the source of your allergy. This step is crucial because unless you know what you are allergic to, there’s no point in trying to treat it. There are several ways that people can be tested for cat allergies:

  • By a doctor (family practice or dermatologist)
  • By a specialist who has experience with cat allergies and knows about the specific breed of cat they have
  • By an allergist who specializes in testing for animal dander allergies

The most important part here is finding out whether or not your symptoms are caused by your cat’s dander or something else entirely. In some cases, people may find out that their symptoms aren’t actually being caused by their cats at all—they’re just allergic to something else entirely!

Your doctor may give you allergy medication like antihistamines, decongestants or steroids.

If you have allergies, your doctor may give you allergy medication like antihistamines, decongestants or steroids. These medicines can help relieve symptoms and make it easier for you to breathe and sleep.

Your doctor may also recommend allergy shots. With these injections, the body learns how to tolerate allergens that affect the nose, skin and lungs. The shots usually take about six months to start working and don’t work for everyone.

Try to limit your exposure as much as possible by limiting contact with the cat.

Because cats are a big part of your life, it may seem like you have no choice but to expose yourself to their dander. However, there are a few things you can do to limit contact as much as possible:

  • Keep the cat out of your bedroom and bathrooms. If they’ve been sleeping on or near your bed or in the bathroom, wash those areas down with an all-natural cleaning product that has antimicrobial properties (such as Thieves Oil). Cleaning up after them will reduce their presence in those rooms and go a long way toward helping you avoid waking up sneezing every morning.
  • Keep them out of your kitchen and living room so that there’s less chance of getting cat hair on food or having them jump onto tables where food is being prepared for guests. Also, because kitchens tend to have warmer temperatures than most other rooms in homes, this can help prevent allergic symptoms from being triggered by heat triggers found in these environments.”

If you have a cat that’s causing you trouble, consider finding it a new home so that it can live happily with someone who isn’t allergic.

If your allergies are severe, you may want to consider finding a new home for your cat. Cats can be wonderful pets, but they’re not always the best choice for people who struggle with allergies. If this is the case and if you’re unable to find another home for your cat (or can’t afford one), then you might want to consider getting a hypoallergenic breed of kitten. These breeds tend not to shed as much fur and produce fewer allergens than many other cats do. However, none are completely hypoallergenic—even those with no fur at all will still shed some dander that could cause an allergic reaction in susceptible individuals like yourself.

In addition, if you’ve already decided on keeping your current feline friend around despite its allergy-inducing tendencies (for example: because you love having him/her around too much), then it’s worth trying out some of these tips from allergists who specialize in treating pet owners:

  • Keep the litter box outside of your bedroom if possible; otherwise place it far away from where people spend time indoors so as not to inhale any airborne particles created by cleaning out said box or dealing with its waste products when scooping out clumps every day later on down the road.* If possible keep clothes worn while taking care of cats separate from clothes worn indoors so that allergens won’t build up over time much more quickly due – especially since many pet owners tend these animals daily without washing hands between tasks.* Try using air purifiers which filter dander before circulating throughout household spaces

You’ll want to keep your bedroom cat-free if possible — that’ll help you sleep better at night and keep you from getting sick.

  • Keep your bedroom cat-free if possible. The more time you spend in a room where you’re not getting any air circulation, the more likely it is that you’ll develop an allergy to the cat’s dander. Having a bedroom that’s totally free of litter boxes and other feline paraphernalia will allow for better sleep and less risk of developing allergies.
  • Keep your bedroom door closed at night. Cats are sneaky creatures; they like to sneak into places they’re not supposed to be. If you want to make sure that there aren’t any unexpected guests in your room while you sleep, keep your door shut at night so they can’t get in!

While it may seem impossible to live with a cat if you’re allergic, there are many ways to reduce your symptoms and make things more comfortable for everyone.

While it may seem impossible to live with a cat if you’re allergic, there are many ways to reduce your symptoms and make things more comfortable for everyone.

First, determine whether or not you’re truly allergic to cats. The first step to living comfortably with a feline friend is getting tested for allergies. Some people are simply sensitive to the dander in cat fur, which can be removed by bathing or brushing your pet regularly (and without conditioner). If these tactics don’t work, try allergy medication before resorting to finding a new home for your kitty companion.

If none of these solutions help, consider limiting exposure—keeping your bedroom cat-free is one way of doing this—or adopting an alternative animal such as an iguana or fish tank full of tropical fish that might be less allergenic than a typical house cat because they produce less dander than their furry counterparts (though they do still have some!).

Conclusion

To summarize, we’ve covered a lot of ways that can help you live with a cat and allergies. Hopefully, this will help make things easier for both you and your feline friend. If you think the issue is becoming too painful or difficult to deal with, talk to your doctor about what options they recommend in these situations. They may be able to prescribe something that’ll work better than over-the-counter medications like Benadryl or Claritin (which are great on their own but not always enough when dealing with extreme cases of allergies). In any case, don’t give up hope – there’s always a solution out there somewhere – so just keep looking until you find it!

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